back


Things in Our Hands
objects casted from melted euro coins, foam pedestals
2014

hands, palms and fists full of euro cents. temperature of the hands warms the money, until it turns soft, loses shape and slowly melts into a puddle of boiling liquid metal. the copper topping vaporises away, the steel bubbles and sputters. after the boiling metal cools down it becomes hard and cold again. the steel remembers the shapes of hands that were once holding it.

these sculptures, which look like mysterious tools, weapons of a dark cult or unidentifiable archaeological finds are made out of melted euro coins. the casts are hard and fragile, pointy and round, sharp and ergonomic. money is liberated from its symbolical value and can be used as tools, as hand axes, as useful survival means: for digging, cutting, stabbing, splitting.

things in our hands embody the state of before and after the existence of money. on one end, they are rooted in pre-history, in the times before money was invented, when collaboration preceded competition and ownership did not infect human interactions. on the other end, they are forecasting the after-apocalyptic future when money becomes valueless and can only count and be used as pure matter. things in our hands look like fossils from the past, but in fact are fossils from the future. in the world of virtual currency, matter will become the burden of value. value is fiction, steel is real.








back